Scots Sangs Fur Schools

Traditional and new Scots songs for use in Scottish schools

Huntly cluster songs - Cairnie, Drumblade, Forgue, Gartly, Kennethmont, Largue, premnay, Rhynie

FAREWEEL TO RHYNIE, KEITH AND GLASS
Fareweel to Rhynie, Keith and Glass
Where sheep and oxen stray
For the leavin you my heart is loath
But oh I cannot stay
GD 1524

THE DOOS O DUNBENNAN
The doos o Dubennan
The kays o Cairnie [jackdaws]
The rooks o Rathven
The folkie o Forgue
An the bodies o Drumblade
The harn-knappocks o Inverkeithny [sackcloth-sewers]
The oily bees o Auchterless
The creeshy shankers o Fyvie [stocking-knitters]
GD 1645


THE DRUMS BEAT TO ORDER
The drums beat to order and the Queen she wants men
And I'll go to the war, should I never come home
I'll clap on my bayonet, make a jewel of my gun
And I'll go to the war, should I never return

When I'm in the battle and the cannon does roar
I'll mind on the girlie I left on yon shore
Farewell to you Rhynie, Kennethmont and Clatt
For I have been in you both early and late

Farewell to you Rhynie, I bid you adieu
For aft-times I've been in you baith sober and fu
But when the war is over and we'll return home
I'll visit the girlie that for me does mourn
GD 100

THE GLASS MARKET
There's been mony a feein market
On this side o the Dee
But the likes o the last Glass market
I never chanced to see
Sing furner-a-a-roo-a-ree
Sing furner-a-a-ree
GD369

THE SCRANKY BLACK FARMER
Up from the low country my course I did steer
To the parish o Kennethmont ye shortly shall hear
Till the heid o the Gairioch, in the lands o Leithhall
A black scranky fairmer inYirksfield did dwell
GD 357G [first verse only]

THE HAUGHS O GARTLY
Lang Lowrie o Bucharn
He wis theer wi's tree o arn [alder stick]
He said he wid then a govairn [govern]
Upon the Haughs o Gairtly
GD 647 [about a game of shinty, tune Haughs o Cromdale]

 

GIN I WERE WHAUR THE GADIE RINS

O gin I were whaur the Gadie rins,
Where the Gadie rins, where the Gadie rins,
O gin I were whaur the Gadie rins
At the back o Benachie.

I never would come back again
Come back again, come back again
I never would come back again
Your lowland lands tae see

I never had but twa richt lads,
But twa richt lads, but twa richt lads,
I never had but twa richt lads,
And so dearly's they loe'd me.

The tane was killed at the Lowrin Fair,
At the Lowrin Fair, at the Lowrin Fair,
The tane was killed at the Lowrin Fair,
The tither was drooned in the Dee.

Gin they'd gien my lovie man for man,
Man for man, man for man,
Gin they'd gien my lovie man for man,
Or yet a man for three,

He wadna lien sae low the day,
Sae low the day, sae low the day,
He wadna lien sae low the day
At the fit o' yon arn tree.

But they croodit in sae thick on him,
Sae thick on him, sae thick on him,
They croodit in sae thick on him
That he couldna fecht nor flee;

And wasna that a dowie day,
A dowie day, a dowie day,
And wasna that a dowie day,
A dowie day for me.

He bocht for me a braw new goon,
A braw new goon, a braw new goon,
He bocht for me a braw new goon,
And ribbons to busk it wi'.

I bocht for him the linen fine,
The linen fine, the linen fine,
I bocht for him the linen fine,
His windin' sheet to be.

The day they're lyin' aneath the mools,
Aneath the mools, aneath the mools,
The day they're lyin' aneath the mools,
That dearly lovit me.

It's noo that twice I've been a bride,
I've been a bride, I've been a bride,
It's noo that twice I've been a bride,
But a wife I'll never be.


There's plenty of other sets of words written later. The tune is evidently "The Hessian's March", presumably brought to Scotland
from the continent (at the time of the Marlborough wars?); but it first appears in 1816. Lowrin or Lowren Fair, BTW, is "Lawrence Fair", the name of two fairs, one held in Rayne, Aberdeenshire [which is what is meant here] and the other at Laurencekirk, Kincardineshire, in mid-August. The arn-tree is the alder. "Dowie"  = doleful. "The day" = "Today".

 

 SLEEPYTOON O' KENNETHMONT
It happened at last Whitsunday,
I tired o' my place,
And I gaed up to Inch to fee,
My fortune for to chase.

And sing airrie erritie adie,
And sing airrie erritie an.

I met in wi' Adam Mitchell,
To fee we did presume,
He's a fairmer in Kennethmont,
And he lives at Sleepytoon.

If you and I agree, he says,
You'll have the fairest play,
For I never bid my servants work
Above ten hours a day.

If a' be true ye tell to me,
I think the place will suit;
Guid-faith, I think I'll gang wi' you,
But ye're an ugly brute.

'Twas on a Monday mornin'
I gaed hame to Sleepytoon,
And he ranked us in guid order
To lay his turnips doon.

I was sent to drive the dung,
Likewise my neighbour Knowles;
But soon the rain it did come on,
And the order cam' to lowse.

The rain it still increased;
The son was at the mill
For meal, old Adam Mitchell said,
Our bellies for to fill.

The rain it soon went over,
And the day began to break;
And our next orders were to scrape
Our dinners frae the secks.

We'll ne'er refuse your orders,
Whate'er ye bid us do;
But to eat the scrapin's o' your secks
Is a thing we'll never do.

Do you refuse what I command,
Ye scoundrels that ye are?
Ye bargained for ten hours a day,
Refuse then if ye daur.

But if the one thing winna dee,
The ither I can try;
I go and get the kitchen-maid
To mix it through the dry.

The order was to bed at nine,
And never leave the toon,
And for every time we left it
We'd be fined half-a-croon.

Knowles he was fined mony's a time,
But never lost the heart;
And I mysel' was fined a pound
For turnin' up a cart.

We never heeded Adam,
But aye we took the pass,
Sometimes to buy tobacco,
Sometimes to see the lass.

But now the term's come at last,
The trifle's safely won,
And we'll awa to Rhynie Muir,
And there we'll hae some fun.

When we are owre in Alford,
We'll gar the gless gae roun',
And we'll tell them o' the usage
That we got at Sleepytoon.

We'll maybe see old Adam yet
Jist at his dish o' brose;
And we'll gie him oor pocket-napkin
To dicht his snuffy nose.

And sing airrie erritie adie,
And sing airrie erritie an.

Footnote : Jock Duncan of Pitlochry, 76 year young, won the coveted Bothy Ballad Singer's Champion of Champions, at Elgin Town Hall in April 2002, singing this 150 year old song. Aberdeenshire born and bred, Jock Duncan had previously won the title in 1994. The competition organised by the Elgin Rotary Club since 1983 was compered by Doric writer and broadcaster Robbie Shepherd.

 

A SONG ABOUT RHYNIE  

Well i've often drove ron the cliffs o' Cove,
Far the water;s sae clear and shiny,
And i've driven past the Durris Mast,
Bit i've nivver bin tae Rhynie.
I'v bin tattie pickin in the parks o' Strichen,
We ma auntie and her wee quinie,
And i've stopped for a chat at Auchnagatt,
Bit i've nivver bin tae Rhynie.

CHORUS
No i've nivver been and i've nivver seen,
No i;ve nivver been tae Rhynie.
No i've nivver been and i've nivver seen,
No i've nivver been tae Rhynie.

We had a gin and coke at the bar at Drumoak,
But the gless they gid ma wis tiny.
And i took masel on the whisky trail,
Bit i've nivver bin tae Rhynie.
I went tae Blairdaff and got signed aff,
Just tae get ma doctors linie.
I swam the channel fin i was on the panel,
But i've nivver swam tae Rhynie.

CHORUS

'Cause Rhynie is a place that i've nivver been,
His it got a pub or a bowling green,
Or is it twa hooses wi a road in atween,
That ill nivver ivver ken.

O I went tae Luton tae dae some grouse shootin,
And the gun that i had wis mine een.
And i thought that Paris wis the capital o Harris,
But ye canna see the tower fae Rhynie.
I bought a villa for my ma in Malaga,
Far the weathers sae rare and finie,
I met ma sisten Shona in a shop in Barcalona,
'Ats a place ye canna phone fae Rhynie.

CHORUS
 

THE BONNY EARL OF MORAY

Ye Hielan's an' ye Lowlan's
O, where have ye been
They hae slain the Earl of Moray
And lain him on the green
He was a braw gallant
And he rode at the ring
An' the bonnie Earl of Moray
O, he micht hae been the king!
O, lang may his lady
Look frae the castle Doune
Ere she see the Earl of Moray
Come soundin' through the toun.

  • 2. Now way be to thee, Huntly
    And wherefore did ye sae?
    I bade you bring him wi' you
    But forbade you him to slay
    He was a braw gallant
    And he play'd at the ball
    An' the Bonnie Earl of Moray
    Was a flower among them all
    Lang may his lady
    Look from the Castle Doune
    Ere she see the Earl of Moray
    Come soundin' through the toun.

    3. Ye Hielan's and ye Lowlan's
    O where hae ye been?
    They have slain the Earl of Moray
    An' laid him on the green
    He was a braw gallant
    And he rode at the gluve
    An' the Bonnie Earl of Moray
    O, he was the Queens' true love
    Lang will his lady
    Look frae the Castle Doune
    Ere she see the Earl of Moray
    Come soundin' through the toun.

    Huntly had a commission to apprehend the Earl, who was in the disgrace of James VI. Huntly, as an ally of Bothwell, asked him to surrender at Donibristle, in Fife; he would not yield to his private enemy, the house was burned, and Murray was slain, Huntly gashing his face. "You have spoiled a better face than your own," said the dying Earl (1592). James Melville mentions contemporary ballads on the murder.